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Computer Science Classwork

More HTML!

posted May 23, 2013, 8:13 AM by Aaron Schilling   [ updated May 23, 2013, 8:13 AM ]

Intro to HTML

posted May 22, 2013, 8:55 AM by Aaron Schilling   [ updated May 22, 2013, 8:56 AM ]

Data Collection

posted Apr 23, 2013, 10:08 AM by Aaron Schilling   [ updated Apr 23, 2013, 10:08 AM ]

Click the link below to read an article about how your search history can tell a lot about you:


After reading the article, answer the following question on your class notes page:

How would you feel if your search history was published for anyone to see? Explain why you would feel this way.

Handshakes and Fenceposts

posted Apr 11, 2013, 7:54 AM by Aaron Schilling   [ updated Apr 11, 2013, 7:55 AM ]

Handshake and Fencepost Activity For each problem, complete the following information.

Understanding the problem: What data or information is known? What is unknown? What are the conditions?

Plan the solution: Show your plan for solving this problem.

Carry out the plan: Using your plan, show your work and your solution.

Review and discuss your solution: Reflect on your solution.


Complete problems #1 and #2 individually.

1. Handshake Problem #1: Assume there are 20 people in a room, including you. You must shake hands with everyone else in the room. How many hands will you shake? If there are N (where N > 0) people in the room, how many hands will you shake?

2. Fence Post Problem: You need to build one side of a fence that is 12 yards long. This fence will be built with fence posts and rails that connect one fence post to another. If each fence post is 1 yard away from the next fence post, how many fence posts will be needed for this side of the fence? How many fence posts will be needed for a side of a fence that is N (where N > 0) yards long?


Read and begin planning your solution for problems #3 and #4. These problems will be completed in class today with your group. Each group will present their solutions to the class.

3. Handshake Problem #2: Assume there are 10 people in a room, including you. Each person in the room must shake hands one time, and only time, with all the other people in the room. How many handshakes will occur? If there are 20 people in the room, how many handshakes will occur? If there are N (where N > 0) people in the room, how many handshakes will occur?

4. Reflections: Why are problems like these important to learn how to solve? How could this type of solution be of benefit to a carpenter, a chef, a teacher?

Programming Music

posted Mar 7, 2013, 9:05 AM by Aaron Schilling   [ updated Mar 7, 2013, 9:06 AM ]

Click on the file below for the worksheet. Answer the questions in your class notes page for today.

Creating a Flow Chart

posted Nov 27, 2012, 7:56 AM by Aaron Schilling   [ updated Nov 27, 2012, 7:56 AM ]

Warm-up: What is the subject of your flow chart? What kinds of people do you think will use your flow chart? Is the purpose of your flow chart to be helpful or entertaining (or both)?

Activity: We will begin creating our flow charts today! If you are using an iPad, you will use the inspiration app. If you are using a desktop computer you will use  Bubbl.us. Start by making a bubble for each of your final options (different teams, foods, musicians, etc.), then create bubbles for each question you will ask. Finally, use arrows to show which path to take after each answer.

Summary: Look at a neighbor's flow chart and work through it. Write down your result and then write 3 things you liked about their flow chart.

Flow Charts

posted Nov 26, 2012, 7:25 AM by Aaron Schilling   [ updated Nov 26, 2012, 2:55 PM ]

Warm-up: Welcome back from break! What was the best part of break for you? What was the worst part of break for you? Explain why.

Notes: 
Flow Chart: a graphic representation of the successive steps in a procedure or system, using symbols interconnected with lines or arrows.

Activity:
Look at each of the flow charts below. Imagine a situation when you would use the flow chart to make a decision. Go through the flow chart, answer the questions, and write down your result in your class notes.

Are you a horse?

What candy should you eat?

If you drop a piece of chocolate in the classroom, should you eat it?

Now that you have practiced using flow charts, we are going to begin creating one of our own! Think about what you are passionate about. Within that passion, what is something that has many different options? For example: different sports teams, different foods, different musicians, different games. List all of the different options that you wish to include.

Summary: What are some of the questions you can ask to narrow down the options for the person using the flow chart?

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